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Guidance

Beyond the planning process there are a number of items that need to be considered for those either planning or attending a funeral or memorial service. The pages below help detail what you should expect from the meetings with the funeral home, what sort of documentation you should prepare for these meetings, and also a task list of items to be sure you take care of after the funeral. We hope you find these resources helpful and if you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us.

 


 

What to Expect Before, During and After the Funeral

Whether you are visiting to make funeral arrangements, would like to know more about what to expect during the funeral service, or wonder how life will be after the funeral, this section of our website will help.

If you still have any questions, call us at (412) 793-3000.

What to Expect Before the Funeral

It's a common enough experience; a loved one dies and now you've got to face something you've never ever done before. You've got to go to a funeral home to make their funeral arrangements. Now, not only are you emotionally affected by their death, you're anxious and really need to know what to expect when you arrive. So, let's talk about that for a bit.

You should know that we've taken great pains to make your experience with us as easy as possible. Here's how:

  • We've put a lot of work into making our funeral home a pleasant place to spend time. That means our interior design is easy-on-the-eye, the rooms are spacious yet cozy, and the furniture is comfortable.
  • Our staff is both professional yet personable. We believe that when you leave, you'll consider us more than funeral directors; we'll be well-on-our-way to being friends. Friends you can really trust to compassionately care for your loved one...and for your family.
  • We've streamlined the funeral arrangement process. Since we've been making funeral arrangements with families for a very long time, we've had ample opportunity to learn the easiest, most efficient way to get through the process. Believe us when we say; it won't take as long as you think.
  • Our team is trained to handle all the details. And we do mean all of them. From filing insurance, social security or veterans administration paperwork; to greeting and bidding farewell to your guests—and everything in between.

Exactly What Happens at the Funeral Home?

While we can't speak to every situation, we can tell you the bare basics of what to expect on your first visit to our funeral home.

  • When you come through the front door, you will be greeted warmly by a staff member. Names will be exchanged, and hands shaken in cordiality. Some words of comfort will be offered
  • Once informed of the reason for your visit, you will be directed to the funeral director's office or arrangement office.
  • Before the funeral arrangement conversation goes very far, you will be given a copy of our General Price List, Casket Price List, and any other appropriate price-related documents. This is done to ensure compliance with the Federal Trade Commission's Funeral Rule.

The funeral director will then ask you a number of questions. Think about it this way: your conversation is intended to do two things: 1.) Share accurate biographical details of the deceased to assist the funeral director in completing relevant paperwork, and 2.) come to an agreement about the plans for the funeral, memorial service, or celebration-of-life.

Clearly State the Facts

When it comes to properly completing death paperwork, and writing a detailed obituary, accuracy is everything. So, when it comes to the first task, that of sharing your loved one's biographical details, you'll want to bring as much documentation of the following as possible:

  • The deceased's full name
  • Their Social Security number
  • Parent's names
  • Spouse and children's names
  • Maiden name of mother
  • Marital status
  • Educational history
  • History of military service
  • Work history
  • Hobbies and interests
  • Church affiliation
  • A list of organizational and club memberships
  • A recent photograph

Naturally, if you're unable to bring any of this information, you can always call us later to share whatever is missing.

Planning for the Funeral Event

The second step in the funeral arrangement conference, that of planning a meaningful ceremony to pay tribute and celebrate the life of your loved one is really at the heart of what you'll be doing that day. In order to facilitate things, we ask that you bring:

  • Pre-arrangement papers, if applicable
  • Clothes in which to bury or cremate your loved one
  • Cemetery property information, if applicable
  • A list of preferred charities for memorial donations, if applicable
  • A list of pallbearers, if applicable
  • Desired musical and readings selections

There are really two more things to bring: your memories, and your heart-driven creative thinking. After all, we will be guided in planning your loved one's funeral, memorial service, or celebration-of-life by your stories, personal perceptions, and insights into their character and lifestyle.

In the End

Our time together will take only as long as you need it to take. Not only that, while the time you spend with us on your first visit can be very intense and emotionally-draining; you'll be among people who really care about your welfare. We'll support you throughout the funeral arrangement process, in any way you need us to; and we believe you'll find that when you leave, you've really had very little to be anxious about. But if you still have any questions or concerns, call us today at (412) 793-3000 to learn more about what to expect when you come to our funeral home.

What to Expect During the Funeral

Much like any other social event, a funeral service can present us with unique challenges–especially if we don't know what to expect. Here's a short list of things you can expect during a funeral:

 

  • We do our best to provide adequate parking facilities. Yet, parking may be hard to find, so do your best to arrive 10-15 minutes early.
  • Depending on the location of the funeral, your entrance may be governed by protocol. Often, guests are asked to remain unseated until the family has taken their seats. Sometimes ushers are provided to escort you to your seat. If you're unclear as to what's expected, just watch others for your cues--or ask the funeral attendant.
  • Again, depending on the location, the ceremony may be officiated by a pastor, minister, celebrant or funeral director.
  • Remember that the front seats are intended for immediate family members, so choose a seat near the middle; or if you didn't know the deceased well, sit near the back of the room.
  • You may receive a copy of the funeral order-of-service, which details what will happen during the ceremony. It will tell you exactly which hymns will be sung, and specifically names the prayers to be read. It's like a program at a theater or symphony performance: the funeral order-of-service is a very handy thing to have. If you're given one, hang on to it.
  • Depending on what's in the order-of-service, you will have the opportunity to participate in various activities. You may be asked to stand to sing a hymn or kneel in prayer; only participate to the degree you feel comfortable.
  • If the service is less traditional and more a celebration-of-life, you may be asked to close the service with a release of a balloon. Or you may find yourself requested to place a flower in the casket. Some families ask their guests to write a note to the deceased and place it in the casket. We suggest doing only as much as you feel comfortable doing.

 

Will People Cry?

Even at weddings and baptisms, people cry. Just like at a funeral, these pivotal life moments are very emotionally-charged. That means you can certainly expect to find people crying at a funeral. It's always helpful to remember to bring a travel pack of tissues with you; however, the funeral home staff will also have access to tissues if you—or the person seated next to you—has a need to wipe their eyes.

But, here's something you should also know: people laugh at funerals too. A funeral is a rich bittersweet mixture of sorrow and joy. In fact, when we're at a funeral (which is fairly often) the behaviors of guests remind us of the well-known remark from Theodore Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss: “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

You'll see tears, and you may hear some laughter. Without doubt, emotions run high at funerals; sometimes there's even a demonstration of anger by one or more of the survivors. Expect people to be on their best behavior, but also know that anything can happen.

How to Leave the Funeral

The funeral officiant will make it very clear that the funeral service is over. They will invite the the immediate family and close friends to leave the building first. Unlike at the end of a theater performance, people don't simply stand up and walk out. Instead, they wait for the rows in front of them to empty before stepping out into the aisle.

Guests and family may collect outside the location for some quiet conversation. If you are now ready to leave, do your best to say a sincere good-bye to the bereaved family.

If you choose to follow the hearse and casket to the cemetery or crematory, you'll be given clear directions by members of the funeral home staff.

If you choose to leave at this point in the funeral, make a quiet, discreet exit. Make a note to yourself to contact the bereaved family by phone in the next week or so. Offer them some time to for them to talk about their loss; and if you're willing, make a few suggestions about chores and other things you could do for them. Know that even if they decline your offer, they'll be delighted to know you're thinking of them enough to call.

Call Us to Learn More

Whether this is your first funeral service or your 100th; it can be an unnerving experience. If you've got specific questions about what to expect during a funeral service, give us a call at (412) 793-3000. We'll be privileged to assist you.

What to Expect After the Funeral

After a funeral, grieving family members often ask us, "What happens next? Here's what happens after a funeral.

The Early Days after Loss

The funeral or memorial service is over. Things have begun to grow quiet; maybe the phone isn't ringing as much as it was, or fewer people are stopping by to check in on you. Your loved one's death continues to become more of a reality. And the very thought of facing your life over the next few weeks and months fills you both with loneliness and a sense of dread. It all feels like way too much to deal with, and we'd like you to know that right now it's okay to take care of yourself first.

You've got two important things to do in the coming weeks and months. As much as possible, you need to practice exquisite self-care. You also need to spend some time focused on completing the paperwork which will officially change the status of your loved one with banks and creditors; employers, insurance companies, and mortgage holders. This can be a slow process; so be prepared for the 'long haul'.

What is Your Relationship Status?

Let's be honest here; the degree to which your grief disempowers you, as well as the amount of flotsam and jetsam (let's just call it "paperwork") you will have to deal with both, depending on the relationship you shared with the deceased. If you are the surviving spouse, a daughter, or son, or have been declared as the designated executor, the responsibilities you have over the death paperwork will be much more extensive than if you were merely a loving niece, nephew, or friend.

The Paperwork

Here is a checklist of the tasks you may be facing in the coming weeks:

Get organized. Locate and safeguard as many of the documents listed below (be sure to put each into in a designated set of file folders, and keep them within easy reach):

  • Birth certificate
  • Driver's License or State Identification Card
  • Passport (if applicable)
  • Marriage certificate
  • Divorce papers (if applicable)
  • Deeds and Titles to real and personal property
  • Veteran's Administration Claim Number (or service discharge papers)
  • Recent Income Tax Forms
  • W-2 forms (if employed)
  • Recent hospitalization records
  • Insurance documents: Life, Health, Automobile (there may be more than one policy in each category)

17 Things to Do After the Funeral

  1. Before you do anything, get a notebook. You'll want to record the date and time of every phone conversation, email, or postal communication; if you did it, write it down. Be sure to include the full name of the person you spoke to, their job title; and their employer identification or extension number.

  2. Request certified copies of the Death Certificate. Speak with one of our funeral professionals to determine just how many you will require.

  3. Check to see if the deceased had left a will. This may require contacting the family attorney, checking your safe deposit box or home safe or the state Will Registry.

  4. Get the mail redirected, if applicable. Visit the United States Postal Service website to learn more about how to submit a Change of Address form. Or stop by your local post office.

  5. Stop health insurance coverage. You may need to provide them with additional information, so keep your relevant paperwork handy.

  6. Contact the employer or union. Determine if there are any death-related benefits available, ask (and answer) questions, and change any relevant contact information.

  7. Make sure to pay the bills. Some folks have their bills paid automatically, but if this isn't the case here, you'll need to take care of them before they become delinquent. If you fear delinquency, you may wish to speak with a representative to work out a payment plan.

  8. Initiate probate. Even if you're not the executor, if you have an interest in the estate, it's possible for you to initiate probate court proceedings (but only if the designated executor of the estate fails to do so in a timely way). You may want to find and hire an estate settlement attorney.

  9. Notify utility departments. Depending on the situation, the accounts may be closed, or the account owner's name and contact details changed.

  10. Transfer title of real and personal property. Whether it's an automobile, boat, motorcycle, RV, or plane; you'll need to inform your state department of motor vehicles of the change in ownership. At the very same time, notify any related vehicular or personal property insurance companies of the change in status.

  11. Close or modify credit card accounts. You will probably need to provide each of them with a certified copy of the death certificate. Again, keep that set of file folders handy.

  12. Contact life insurance companies. Not everyone has life insurance, but some people have more than one policy. No matter how many policies were in force, you will probably need to provide each of them with a certified copy of the death certificate for each claim made.

  13. Notify other policyholders of the change in "Beneficiary" status. If your loved one was a designated beneficiary on the insurance policies; investment or banking accounts of other individuals, then you'll need to notify them of the death of a beneficiary.

  14. Arrange to close or modify bank accounts. Depending on your relationship to the deceased, you may be entitled to convert into your name.

  15. Change stocks and bonds into your name. Again, this depends on your relationship status to the deceased. To do this, you'll need to provide a certified copy of the death certificate to all organizations involved.

  16. Report the death to other agencies. Depending on the age or military status of the deceased, you may need to notify either the Social Security Administration or the Veterans Administration (or both). Other agencies of interest include membership organizations (professional or avocational associations, Masonic lodges, Rotary Clubs, gym, and golf course memberships –just to name a few).

  17. Tend to their digital estate. If they were active on social media, you'll need to inform the specific networking sites of the change in status. You will need to close email accounts as well as any online banking portal or investment accounts.

Do You Have Any Questions?

We've had the privilege of serving many families over the years, and during that time we've found that the time after the funeral is different for everyone involved. If we can be of assistance to you during this challenging time of change and adjustment, simply pick up the phone and call us at (412) 793-3000. We'll do our very best to support you.

 


 

Funeral Etiquette

Also known as social graces, the rules of etiquette ease us through challenging social situations. Most of us know how to behave in common circumstances but unless you've been to a lot of funerals, you may not know the rules of proper behavior in this often uncomfortable social situation.

The Basics of Funeral Etiquette

Emily Post once said, "Manners are a sensitive awareness of the feelings of others." Much of what we know today about etiquette comes from this woman, who published her first book of etiquette in 1922. When you use those words as your guide, the rules of funeral etiquette become easier to understand.

What to Wear

Tradition has always required a certain level of formality in dressing for a funeral. However, today's end-of-life services are so varied — ranging from the traditional funeral to the often more relaxed celebration of life — that it's challenging to know exactly what's expected of you.

The advisors on the Emily Post website tell readers that "attire isn't limited to just black or dark gray. Remember, though, that it is a serious occasion and your attire should reflect that, especially if you are participating in the service. At the very least it should be clean, neat, and pressed as for any other important occasion."

What to Say

No one expects you to say more than a few words and bereaved family members are often unable to give you their full attention anyway. So, keep it short and make it sincere.

"I'm so very sorry for your loss" may work very well. If you have time to add to those seven words, you might want to share a personal story about a time you shared with the deceased. But, watch closely for signs that your audience needs to move on to receive condolences from other funeral guests.

When speaking to other funeral guests, speak quietly. This is not a time to discuss business or share stories about your recent vacation. Instead, focus on sharing and listening to stories of times spent with the deceased.

What to Do

If you're unsure about what actions to take when being led by a pastor or celebrant, simply follow along. If you're not comfortable, don't draw attention to your unwillingness to participate. Be discrete and respectful of others.

Always leave your cell phone in the car or at the very least, turn it to vibrate mode or turn it off.

How to Handle the Visitation

A visitation, or viewing, is a time prior to the funeral where guests are invited to view the casketed body of the deceased. While it is customary to show your respects to the deceased by stepping up to the casket, you may not feel comfortable doing so. That's perfectly alright; no one wants you to be unnerved by the experience, so focus your attention instead on providing comfort to the bereaved family.

After the Funeral

If the deceased is to be buried following the service, the funeral officiant will announce the location of the interment. If the cemetery is not located on the grounds of the funeral home, there will be a processional of cars formed to escort the hearse to the cemetery. Unless they have chosen to have a private burial, those in attendance are welcome to join in the procession however, don't feel obligated to do so. You may simply leave the funeral at that time.

The Funeral Reception

Many families today hold a post-funeral gathering where food and refreshments are served. While this is a time to share memories, laughter, and even tears, your behavior at a funeral reception needs to remain respectful.

Follow Up with Kindness

If you've not already done so, this is a good time to send the family a sympathy note or card. About a week after the funeral, pick up the phone to check in with them to see if there's anything they need.

"Good manners," wrote Emily Post, "reflect something from inside — an innate sense of consideration for others and respect for self." We think that just about sums it up; no matter the situation — wedding, baptism, dinner party or cocktails with friends — her observations about good manners (when followed) will serve us all well.

 


 

Legal & Estate Guidance

Legal Advice

The death of a loved one can mean that you will need to find an attorney to help with the process of estate settlement. While it isn't necessary to have an attorney prepare an advance directive, it can be advantageous to have one prepare your will or any other estate-related documents.

We have some suggestions to help you find the best attorney to provide the kind of legal services you need:

  • Think specialization. You don't need just any attorney; you're looking for someone with experience in a particular aspect of the law.
  • Ask around. There's nothing like a personal referral from someone you trust. Talk to friends, family, co-workers, and neighbors to see if they can recommend an attorney with the right expertise.
  • Get in touch with the local Bar Association. It will have a directory of all practicing lawyers in your area.
  • Visit legal aid websites. These organizations can provide you with trusted referrals and legal consultation services.

The Next Step in Getting Legal Help

At this point, you should have a list of four or five recommended local attorneys. Now it's time to make that first call. You should first ask to set up a face-to-face meeting but be aware that many attorneys charge for this introductory session. That's why your first question should be: "Do you charge for the initial visit?"

If you do agree to a face-to-face meeting, it's important to ask the following questions but be observant too. Look around: is the office organized? Is he or she listening closely to what you have to say? What is your gut feeling to what you're seeing and hearing? Trust your intuition; if you don't feel you are a good match, then move on to the next attorney on your list.

The questions to ask in your initial interview are:

  • Do you specialize in my type of case?
  • Do you have any special credentials?
  • Exactly who will handle my case; the attorney or a paralegal?
  • Who will be my point-of-contact?
  • What's the preferred way to communicate with your office?
  • Will I be billed for phone calls and email correspondence with either the attorney or staff?
  • How will I be informed about any progress in my case?
  • How will fees be calculated? Hourly, contingency, or flat fee? If I will be billed hourly, will I be required to pay for portions of an hour?
  • What expenses am I responsible for?
  • How often can I expect to receive a bill?
  • Is advance payment required? What happens to that money if I terminate the case before it's resolved?
  • Will I receive copies of all documents pertaining to my case?

When you're satisfied you've found the right attorney at the right price, always ask for a written agreement and read it thoroughly. If you have questions about what you've read, ask them before you sign.

Sources:

  1. Liz Davidson, "How to Find a Good Lawyer When You Really Need One"
  2. Consumer Reports, "When You Need to Lawyer Up"
  3. Henry, Alan, "How to Find a Reputable Lawyer"

Estate Settlement

Sometimes estate settlement is one of the hardest aspects of dealing with the death of a family member. This doesn't have to be the case if proper preparation of all estate documents took place prior to the death. If you have the services of an experienced estate lawyer at your disposal, there can be even less worry and strife.

What is Probate?

Probate: the official proving of a will. The probate process is intended to establish the legal validity of a will but it involves so much more than merely confirming that the signed, witnessed, and registered copy of a will is authentic.

The Probate Process

In addition to proving in a court of law that the deceased individual's will is valid, probate also declares the probate process also involves:

  • Identifying and inventorying the deceased's personal and real property
  • Having the property appraised
  • Paying debts and taxes
  • Distributing the remaining property as the will (or if there is no will, then state law) directs

What Happens When There is No Will?

When someone dies without leaving a dated, signed and properly witnessed will, the court decides who should receive the deceased's assets. It won't matter what your familial relationships were really like; the state will award property and cash to the survivors based solely on their legal relationship to the deceased. This is called dying "intestate". Generally only spouses, common-law spouses, and blood relatives inherit under intestate succession laws.

All this can be avoided, if you take care of things ahead of time. When you leave documents that clearly state who you wish to get your property and cash after you die, you better support your survivors in coming to terms with your death without leaving them with a lot of unnecessary distress.

Hiring an Attorney

Losing a loved one can be an overwhelming experience and when you add in estate settlement issues, the months following the death can be much more than we bargained for. That's when it might be advantageous to hire an attorney.

When faced with this situation, it's best to turn to the experts in estate settlement.

 


 

Veterans Services

To best honor those who have served us, Soxman Funeral Homes, Ltd. is proud to provide a full variety of Military Honors to veterans and their families to enrich the funeral service. With the proper documentation (Honorable Discharge DD-214), we can arrange to have the following honors rendered at the final service place:

  • Two uniformed representatives from the Veteran's branch of service to fold and present the flag to the Next of Kin
  • Local American Legion or VFW members posting Honor Guard and offering a gun salute and the playing of Taps over the flag draped remains.

We also complete all of the paperwork necessary for the following Veterans Benefits:

  • An American Flag
  • Financial Benefits through the county of death
  • Financial Benefits through the Federal VA
  • Headstone
  • Emblem Markers for Memorial Flags at grave site
  • National Cemetery burials
  • Death Certificates

We can explain the details of each of these benefits based on what would best suit your loved one.

 


 

How to Write a Eulogy

"The writing and reading of a eulogy is, above all, the simple and elegant search for small truths. This can be surprisingly hard, to take notice of the smallest, most unpolished details of a life and set them up for us to stare at in the wonder of recognition."
—Tom Chiarella, "How to Give a Eulogy"

How do you begin writing a eulogy? Editor Carol DeChant explains, "Obituaries are usually mini-biographies, focused on what a person did, but the eulogy is much deeper, more about who the person was...It's meant for the select group of people who knew and cared for that person, or who care for the survivors."

Christina Ianzito, in "How to Write a Eulogy," offers these suggestions; many of them come from Garry Schaeffer's book, A Labor of Love: How to Write a Eulogy:

  • Outline the eulogy. In addition to helping you stay focused, an outline will keep your eulogy organized and effectively break down the task of writing into manageable pieces.
  • Ask for the input of other family members and friends. They may be able to provide you with some great stories to share.
  • Always try to share examples of the statements you make about your loved one. If you want to say, "she was generous with her time," tell a story that supports the statement.
  • Do not focus too much on yourself. After all, this isn't a eulogy for you; keep your writing focused on your loved one. You may even want to ask others to read your first draft to make sure the focus is in the right place.
  • Go for the humor. Shared laughter is a very healing experience so don't be afraid to make people laugh.
  • Write the first draft. Don't fuss over every word; just get your ideas on paper.
  • Put it aside for a while. This has, no doubt, been an emotional experience. Take some time away from the writing desk to get perspective and release stress or sorrow.
  • Come back to edit and polish. This is the time to refine the eulogy into its final form.
  • Print a legible copy of the eulogy, in a large font, to assist in the delivery of your well-chosen words. There's nothing worse than not being able to read your handwriting when you're standing in front of a crowd of people.

Delivering a Eulogy

Unless you're a seasoned public speaker, delivering a eulogy can be a scary, emotionally-trying time. It is recommended that you:

  • Take your time with the delivery.
  • Breathe deeply.
  • Stay relaxed.
  • Take regular sips of water.

If you have any doubts about your ability to perform in front of an audience, consider appointing a back-up person to fill in for you. Or, you may ask someone else to take over the duty of reading the eulogy aloud on your behalf.

"Giving a eulogy is good for you," says author, Tom Chiarella. "It may hurt to write it. And reading it? For some, that's the worst part. The world might spin a little, and everything familiar to you might fade for a few minutes. But remember, remind yourself as you stand there, you are the lucky one. And that's not because you aren't dead. You were selected. You get to stand, face the group, the family, the world, and add it up. You're being asked to do something at the very moment when nothing can be done. You get the last word in the attempt to define the outlines of a life."

Where to Find the Best Eulogies Online

All you need to do is search online for "best eulogies" or simply "eulogies"—you'll be directed to literally dozens of videos and articles.

Should you still find yourself in need of support, please give us a call. We will be delighted to discuss other available resources.

Sources:

  1. Chiarella, Tom, "How to Give a Eulogy"
  2. Ianzito, Christina, "How to Write a Eulogy"

How to Write an Obituary

What's involved in writing a good obituary? That's really the first thing you have to think about when sitting down to write one for a spouse, other family members, or a close friend. Exactly what factual information should it include and how can you find a balance between dry facts and engaging storytelling? We have the answers to those questions and hope you will find this information about how to write an obituary helpful.

What's the Difference Between an Obituary and a Death Notice?

The obituary is a longer, more detailed look at the life of the deceased and the death notice is merely a compilation of relevant facts. The obituary also includes those essential details but it expands on them to provide a more complete look at the deceased's life experiences.

The first of the details would, of course, be their name. If she was a married woman, you'll want to include her maiden name and if he or she was commonly known by a nickname, you may want to add that as well.

Other essential details to include when writing either a death notice or an obituary are:

  • Their age upon death
  • Birthday
  • Birthplace
  • A list of the surviving relatives
  • The date of death
  • The location (city/state) where they died
  • Details about the funeral service: date, time, place
  • Full name
  • Date of death
  • Where the person lived

We think it benefits the families we serve when we remind them of the simple truth: in writing an obituary for your loved one, you have the opportunity to serve future generations — not only of your immediate family but of the society as a whole. You are, in effect, recording history on an individual scale. It's a humbling yet inspiring thought.

Well-Written Obituaries

It's very easy to find examples of obituaries that are worthy of attention. There are interesting obituaries for everyday folks that inspire us; maybe even make us cry or laugh. Obituaries which, when we're done reading them, we say to ourselves, "I wish I'd had a chance to get to know that person." Obituaries are scattered in cyberspace, acting as digital records of a life, a time, and a place; and recently, some very funny obituaries have been written.

Will writing our own obituaries become a trend? Maybe. We know many more people are writing their own obituaries today as it's often given as an assignment in certain college and university courses.

How you document your loved one's life story is up to you. With that said, we recommend that in addition to the facts of a death notice listed above, the enhanced death notice, known as an obituary, could also include these details:

  • Parents' names
  • Information about the spouse and children
  • Church affiliations
  • Job or career information
  • Personal and professional accomplishments
  • Personal character and interests
  • Influence on his or her community

It's now time to push the facts aside. Sit back and think about the anecdotes and memories you could share to shed some light on your loved one's character and personal interests. Bring factual details into play whenever you can to help the reader clearly see who your loved one was, how they lived, what they did, who, and what they loved. The more rich in detail, the more memorable the obituary becomes.

Double-Check Spelling and Grammar

Before you give a copy of the final draft of your loved one's obituary, be sure to read it through twice or even three times. You're looking for errors in spelling and grammar but you also want to make sure your facts are straight.

Don't Hesitate to Call Us

We would be happy to offer some suggestions if you're stuck. Call us to discover how we can help you to shine a brighter spotlight on their life.

Soxman Funeral Home
Phone: (412) 793-3000
Fax: (412) 798-9897
Email: staff@soxmanfuneralhomes.com
7450 Saltsburg Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15235


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